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welcome to disease section for

carpal tunnel syndrome 

The Brain: Anatomy And Functions

The Brain: Anatomy And Functions

patient education

The brain is a wonderful three-pound organ that controls all the functions of human body and interprets information from around the world. It is one of the most complex organs in our body. It is made up of more than 100 billion nerves that communicate in trillions of connections called synapses.

Thumb and Finger Exercises for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Thumb and Finger Exercises for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

patient education

Your fingers and thumb get severely affected due to the pain in carpal tunnel syndrome. You should try to keep your affected fingers in a stable position to help reduce the effects of carpal tunnel syndrome or another repetitive strain injury. Besides, you should also take frequent breaks when working on a desk or a computer.

Stretching and Wrist Strengthening Exercises for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Stretching and Wrist Strengthening Exercises for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

patient education

Stretching exercises of the muscles surrounding the wrist can help in reviving the condition of tendons which pass through the carpal tunnel and can help in maintaining good health of the tendons. These exercises can help in easing the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome and if followed earlier can help in preventing it too.

Physical Therapy and Exercises after Carpal Tunnel Surgery

Physical Therapy and Exercises after Carpal Tunnel Surgery

patient education

During a carpal tunnel syndrome, the median nerve is compressed within the tunnel by overuse of your wrist and fingers or by trauma to your hand resulting in pain, numbness, tingling and weakness. Recovery exercises help you in improving your range of motion, nerve gliding, strengthening and desensitization.

Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Procedure and Recovery Time

Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Procedure and Recovery Time

patient education

Most of the cases of carpal tunnel surgery are done on an outpatient basis and it’s not painful at all. The surgery is performed either under general anaesthesia, which puts you to sleep, or under local anaesthesia, which numbs your hand and arm. You might be given a light sedative through an intravenous line.