welcome to disease section for achondroplasia 

Head Scan for hydrocephalus
Head Scan for hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus can be diagnosed through a CT scan, an MRI, or an ultrasound (in infants). These scans help in showing the build-up of cerebrospinal fluid on the brain and the increased pressure, as well as highlighting any structural defects that may be causing the problem. CT scans for hydrocephalus are used only during emergency examination. [Image used under Creative Commons License from Wikimedia]

Shunt Surgery for
Shunt Surgery for "water in the brain"

Shunt surgery for hydrocephalus (a condition commonly found in children with achondroplasia): A long tube or a shunt is surgically inserted in the body which helps cerebrospinal fluid to flow at a normal rate and in the right direction. The shunt is supposed to be a drainage system comprising of a long tube with a valve. One end of the tube is inserted in your brain and the other end into your chest or abdominal cavity. Excess fluid is drained out from the brain to the areas where it can be more easily absorbed. [Image used under Creative Commons License from Wikimedia]

Effect of hydrocephalus on the brain
Effect of hydrocephalus on the brain

Hydrocephalus is a condition which can be explained as “water in the brain”. It commonly occurs in children suffering with achondroplasia or dwarfism. In this condition, the ventricles enlarge due to which the head size increases. The excess fluid in the brain increases the size of the ventricles or the cavities which puts pressure on the brain. This excess fluid is called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). [Image used under Creative Commons License from Wikimedia]

Crooked teeth: A symptom of Achondroplasia
Crooked teeth: A symptom of Achondroplasia

Teeth crowding or misalignment of teeth or crooked teeth is one of the symptoms associated with achondroplasia. Children suffering from achondroplasia experience bone deformities due to which the growing teeth also emerge as misaligned. In most cases, crooked teeth are due to shorter jaw. Panoramic radiography is used to detect the actual position of the teeth placed in the jaw. [Image used under Creative Commons License from Wikimedia]

X-ray scan image of a boy with short legs
X-ray scan image of a boy with short legs

The picture depicts an X-ray diagram of a six year boy showing the characteristic radiographic appearance of the hips. In achondroplasia, a child's arms and legs are short in proportion to body length. Radiographic imaging or X-ray scan of the infant may also be used to diagnose achondroplasia as the long bones show changes from the x-ray scans of non-affected infants. X-ray scans can also help in detecting shortened spinal pedicles distally with a decreased interpedicular distance in the inferior lumbar spine compared with the superior lumbar spine. [Image used under Creative Commons License from Wikimedia]