welcome to disease section for macular degeneration 

Eye disorders
Eye disorders

The illustration shows how the vision is affected by different types of macular degeneration as compared to normal eye vision with AMD. There are two types of AMD: dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular or exudative). Dry type AMD progresses to the wet type. In case of dry AMD, parts of the macula get thinner with age and tiny clumps of protein grow. This leads to loss of central vision and there is no proper cure for it. In wet type, new blood vessels grow beneath the retina and leak blood and fluid causing permanent damage to light-sensitive retinal cells, which die off and create blind spots in central vision.

How does AMD affect your eyes?
How does AMD affect your eyes?

The illustration shows effects of different types of AMD as compared to healthy eyes. AMD is an eye vision disorder and in some cases a person can become blind. AMD causes damage to the macula, a small spot near the center of the retina and the part of the eye needed for sharp, central vision, which allows us to see objects that are straight ahead. Since the disease affects the central vision, the ability to read, watch television and the need of detailed vision is lost but the remaining peripheral vision is available well enough.

Eye Anatomy
Eye Anatomy

The eye is our organ of sight. The eye has a number of components which include but are not limited to the cornea, iris, pupil, lens, retina, macula, optic nerve, choroid and vitreous.

Healthy eye vs eye with macular degeneration
Healthy eye vs eye with macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is always bilateral (i.e., it occurs in both eyes), but does not necessarily progress at the same pace in both the eyes. A person with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may not be able to see your eyes, but may still make eye contact because he or she can see at least the outline of your face.

Types of macular degeneration
Types of macular degeneration

There are two types of AMD: dry (also called atrophic) and wet (also called neovascular or exudative). Most cases of AMD starts as dry AMD and in 10-20% of individuals, it progresses to the wet type. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over age 60 years. 

Age-related macular degeneration in a patient
Age-related macular degeneration in a patient

The illustration shows medical photo of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a patient.

Retinal photo with age-related macular degeneration in a patient
Retinal photo with age-related macular degeneration in a patient

The image shows retinal photo of macular scarring with normal blood vessels and optic nerve.

Laser treatment of macula
Laser treatment of macula

Sequence of three images shows the laser treatment of macula. Laser photocoagulation is used to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) only. But only about 15 out of 100 cases can be effectively treated with laser photocoagulation surgery.